Dominion Virginia Power ordered to refund $19.7 million to customers, but gets to keep a billion in future overcharges

"Keep counting, Mr. Farrell. There's a billion more where this came from." Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Valdemar-Melanko-1965 public domain.

“Keep counting, Mr. Farrell. There’s a billion more where this came from.” Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons Valdemar-Melanko-1965 public domain.

The State Corporation Commission has ordered Dominion Virginia Power to refund $19.7 million to customers, reflecting excess earnings during 2013 and 2014. But according to the November 23 order, the company will not have to lower its rates going forward, due to its success last winter in getting a bill passed that freezes base rates and eliminates rate reviews until 2022.*

That legislation, SB 1349, was widely criticized (including by me) as a handout to Dominion. How big a handout is now clear: “over a billion dollars,” according to the calculation of Judge James Dimitri, one of the three SCC commissioners.

Writing in a partial dissent, Judge Dimitri called SB 1349 unconstitutional, noting that Article IX, Section 2 of Virginia’s Constitution explicitly assigns rate-setting authority to the SCC. Thus, said Dimitri, the SCC should give no credence to SB 1349, and consequently should order a refund covering 2013 and 2014, and follow normal procedure to lower base rates going forward.

A rate decrease is appropriate, according to Dimitri, because “The record in this case and other biennial review proceedings demonstrate that, when conventional rate standards are applied, there have been, and are projected to continue to be, excessive base rates that are being paid by Dominion customers. “

And again: “The trend of current rates producing revenues over cost and a fair return has been continuing. For 2015, the Commission Staff projects revenues over a fair return of $301 million, and $299 million for 2016. . . The current rate levels, which the Commission has not been authorized to adjust, are designed to produce and have been producing annual excess revenues of hundreds of millions of dollars.”

As a result, concludes Judge Dimitri, “If base rates are fixed at current levels for at least the next seven years, earnings over and above the Company’s cost of service and a fair return have the potential to reach well over a billion dollars, at customer expense.”

The two other judges, Mark Christie and Judith Jagdmann, don’t address the constitutionality issue in their opinion for the majority. Indeed, it appears that none of the parties in the case raised the constitutional question in the proceedings, nor did any of the judges request briefing of the issue later, as sometimes happens.

Taking a cue from Judge Dimitri, however, on December 11 the Virginia Committee for Fair Utility Rates, one of the parties to the rate case, filed a Petition for Rehearing or Reconsideration, objecting to the commission’s order for failing to rule explicitly on the issue. The Committee asked for a hearing on the constitutional issue and asking for an order finding the provisions of SB 1349 unconstitutional.

Three days later, however, the SCC denied the petition in a second order, noting that the constitutional argument had not been raised during the rate case. Dmitri again dissented, saying he would grant reconsideration.

What happens now? Ordinarily any decision issued by the SCC can be appealed to the Virginia Supreme Court; but then, ordinarily you have to raise an issue during a proceeding before you can appeal it. It’s not clear whether the Court will agree to hear an appeal of these two orders if the Virginia Committee for Fair Utility Rates decides to pursue it.

With a billion dollars at stake, this is not an argument that should be ignored merely because it wasn’t raised in time. But there is also a reason the claim wasn’t raised earlier in the case: it’s a rate case looking backwards, not forwards, so the SCC didn’t actually have to address SB 1349.

Legal experts tell me that the Virginia Committee for Fair Utility Rates—or anyone else for that matter—can still challenge the constitutionality of SB 1349 by filing a new and separate case seeking a declaratory judgment from the SCC. A new case, with new arguments, yielding a decision on the merits, would most certainly be appealable to the Court.

__________________________

*The case is PUE-2015-00027. Links to documents on the SCC website work only some of the time. That counts as an improvement.

5 thoughts on “Dominion Virginia Power ordered to refund $19.7 million to customers, but gets to keep a billion in future overcharges

  1. Ivy, it’s undeniable that Dominion (like many other American energy companies) is exercising an unprecedented degree of influence over state and federal representatives. You write:

    “That legislation, SB 1349, was widely criticized (including by me) as a handout to Dominion. How big a handout is now clear: “over a billion dollars,” according to the calculation of Judge James Dmitri, one of the three SCC commissioners.”

    FDR recognized over 70 years ago that utilities enjoying a monopoly on public power would have to be kept on a tight leash, so he enacted legislation preventing them from making contributions to political campaigns; lobbying required a filing with the SEC. The 2005 repeal of the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935 removed these restrictions, and by the 2014 campaign cycle Dominion had moved into the top 2% of political spending:

    Dominion Resources 2014 Political Spending

    Federal Campaign Contributions
    $741,000

    Leadership PAC Contributions
    $170,300

    Political Committee Contributions
    $194,150

    Total Contributions: $1,126,651
    Lobbying: $2,000,000

    Source: https://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/summary.php?id=D000000335&cycle=2014

    PUHCA of 1935 contained the phrase “public interest” 68 times. With the floodgates of corporate influence wide open in 2015, it’s hard to understand who is defending it.

  2. Pingback: Florida solar choice advocates focusing now on 2018 ballot | Southeast Energy News

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  4. It’s certainly looking like the effects of SB1349 relinquishing SCC control over Dominion rates can’t be dealt with short of the courts. What’s next? I understand they intend to build N.Anna#3 and bill us in advance! Please keep us posted, and bravo for your steady clarity on these issues. Anne

  5. Pingback: Dominion Power defends its billion-dollar handout from ratepayers; squashes dissent; asks for more. | Power for the People VA

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